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. >>> after weeks of controversy, resignation and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue yesterday, sunday. the final issue of the british tabloid reading, thank you and good-bye. it comes as explosive new allegations come to light about the phone-hacking scandal surrounding the paper. the rival "the mirror" reports today a new york city reports "news of the world" asked for voice mail of 9/11 victims. the report says the tabloid wanted phone numbers and details of calls leading up to the terror attacks almost a decade ago. nbc's anabel reports on the demise. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived in london to oversee the crisis threatening his media empire in britain. on the road to his headquarters he enjoyed one last read of the newspaper he closed down last week. "thank you and good-bye" screamed the front page. it was britain's biggest selling paper with an unbeaten record for exposing corruption but the tables have turned and it is now being investigated following allegations of police bribery and widespread hacking of personal voice mails. few of the current sta
britain's corridors of power. brooks is answering police questions. >> reporter: in the cozy world of british politics and media, rebecca brooks was at its very center. she wined and dined the rich and powerful on behalf of her boss and mentor, rupert murdoch. brooks first came to news international as a secretary at "news of the world." she quickly developed a reputation for her tenacity as a journalist, reportedly once disguising herself as a cleaning lady to scoop a competitor. described as both ruthless and charming, she was soon the youngest editor of the "news of the world," and shortly after "the sun," both named by murdoch's news international. she spearheaded a controversial campaign to, quote, name and shame alleged pedophiles, publishing their names and addresses in the paper. as the editor of "the sun," brooks testified to parliament that her paper had paid police officers for information. and it was under her editorship that the "news of the world" allegedly paid a private investigator to hack into the voicemail messages of millie doweller, the 13-year-old girl murdere
will compete, but >>> euro fighter has been ordered by its four partner nations, britain, germy, britain and spain. but india is seen as critical to keep production going. we caught up with enzo cazellini at the air show. >> congratulations with india where you were chosen for the fighter competition. i want to start by asking you, how do you expect to win. how do you expect to beat euro. >> let me start by saying that we're going to -- we have cooperation with india and france. we know india, we know the country and we believe that india can make boosts from the political level and continue this full type of click collaboration with spain. >> reporter: and do you feel you have a stronger industrial cooperation package as well. >> we have also very strong cooperation. we believe that all together we can offer much more attractive situation for the future development of india industry. >> reporter: of the whole order of aircraft about 130 aircraft or so, 18 of them are supposed to be built in europe in existing factories but the rest coproduced with hanestan in india. but hanesta had some
..the phone hackinn scandal inn britain just the latest example of today's vulnerabiliiies.and just as the pentagon unveiiee its plann foo operrtions in cyberspace, toppofficiils reveeled one of the worst breaches ever. "in a single intrusion this march 24,000 files were ttken." "it was done we ttink by a foreign inttlligence serrice, a nation state waa behind it." pentagon officials confirmed it wws sensitive us military data, taken from a contractors' computer system. cyberspace is now a pptential warzone. "cybbr attacks will be a significant component of futureeconflict, whether it involves major nations, rogue states or terrorist groupssin 2008 an infected flaasdrive was inserred into laptop on a us miliiary base. ...a foreign spy agency ad placed a malicious code on the drive transferred secret data to foreign control. for the first time a foreign govvrnment had a cyber beach head. the new pentagon strategy focusss on defending military systems from theft aad ddnial or disuption of "you're going to wind up using component elements that are built around the world. and so t
to bailing out greece. >> britain is not in the euro. while i am prime minister, it will never be. we should not be involved in the euro areas internal arrangements. only euro countries were involved in the first bailout. only eurozone countries have been in the discussion about further bailout. it is right not to use the e.u.- wide financial stability mechanism for future aid to greece. >> the worst outcome for the british economy from the greek crisis would be a disorderly and chaotic the of fault -- default and departure from the euro. what discussions have we had about preparing for that default which is inevitable? the president himself has said that it does not need to be disorderly to dissolve the without the currency's much destruction. >> what is causing disorder and the fact they're going bankrupt. nothing said in this chamber will alter that. if greece can neither withdraw or default, then good money via our money or the imf will be wasted bailing out greece. why not leave an orderly withdrawal of greece from the euro? >> is it time to dispose of these things? checks seem to have
been a public savings announcement. out there with a better way. now, that's progressive. >>> britain's "daily mirror" reports that journalists of "news of the world" unsuccessfully try ied to hack into 9/11 victims' phones. >>> cruise ship went down. at least 80 people have been rescued but about 100 more are still missing. >>> the u.s. is withholding $800 million in aid to pakistan. top u.s. officials say it's meant to pressure pakistan to crack down on militants. >>> now there's new evidence of just how strained the relations are between the u.s. and one of its most critical allies in the fight against terror. today, a defiant pakistan is shrugging off the white house decision to withhold $800 million in aid for that country's military. chris lawrence at the pentagon. we should talk about what all the money goes toward. it's sort of understandable when you think this is the country where they found osama bin laden. you wonder why the u.s. is giving so much money to its military. >> that's right. and, really, this is part of the whole fallout from the whole osama bin laden operation
of the biggest selling papers in britain. it has a reputation second to none, really, for uncovering scandals and gossip, and has been at the center of this massive controversy that has exploded with revelations that they had hacked into the voice mail messages of a 13-year-old schoolgirl who was murdered, in 0rd to get salacious stories. that has provoked a huge back lash with an emergency debate in the british parliament. 9 prime minister came out and roundly condemned them. the advertisers were fleeing in droves, and now they have taken the ultimate sanction. >> do we think that's the case of the dead teenager that was the final straw here, because there have been a lot of complaints, and we've even seen recently celebrities coming forward, i believe hugh grand was one of them. was that the case that was brought before them, where they realized they could just not survive? >> i think if that had been on its own, it would have been bad enough, and they may well have taken the decision. that coupled with the news they had allegedly hacked into the voicemail messages of the families of soldie
messages of millie dowler, a 13 yeerl girl murdered in britain whose court case and investigation made front page headlines. the allegations didn't come to light until almost a decade later after brooks scaled the public ladder to be chief executive of news international, a position she resigned last week. brooks has denied having any knowledge of phone hacking by her staff. it was brooks who cemented a relationship with prime minister david cameron, inviting him to lunches at her country home with the head of news corporation, rupert murdoch's son, james. there have been several arrests in the phone hacking scandal so far. rebecca brooks is the highest profile yet, and the one closest to rupert murdoch himself. >> brooks admitted to paying police for information. i asked lisa bloom why it wasn't a bigger deal back then. >> i think we got the answer to that today, don. it appears law enforcement was intimately tied up with the corruption scan danld hacking scandal with britain's top cop saying he should have handled things differently. i believe this is the beginning of the uk's waterg
's still unclear whether his attorney will seek an insanity defense. >>> britain's best-selling tabloid is accused of sinking to a new low. it's at the center of a growing phone hacking scandal whose targets allegedly include murder victims, terror victims, celebrities and politicians. abc's jeffrey kofman has the latest from london. >> reporter: just how low would they go? that's the question being asked about a scandal at britain's biggest newspaper, the racy tabloid "news of the world." the paper has admitted hacking the phones of celebrities but it is now accused of hacking the cell phone of missing 13-year-old millie dowler in 2002, deleleng messages and giving her parents and police false hopes that the girl was still alive. when lonondon was hit with terrorist bombs in the 2005 that killed 52 people, the "news of the world" allegedly hacked the phones of victims and their families in pursuit of yet more exclusives. >> it's a violation, isn't it. i still don't know what i think about it. other than, i'm really angry >> reporter: the paper is the profitable
's when i stumbled upon william e. dodd. >> britain's parliament has gone into its summer recess. the bbc parliament channel be kept the last several months in the house of commons in british politics in this one-hour record review program. some of the issues covered include the news corp. phone hacking scandal come in the royal wedding in president obama says it. >> hello and welcome to the special edition of the record review, when we look after an eventful summer term at parliament, he turns anything distinguished guests, rigorous questioning and much in the way of political drama. >> for the grandson of a kenyan who served as a cook and the british army to stand before you as president of the united states. >> this is a shocking mass. in fact, it's a scandal. >> have you ever received payment for any news? >> absolutely not. i can't believe he suggested that. >> the fact we do not have democratic legitimacy undermines our capacity to act as a check and balance. >> why disney know about these arguments? the house of commons is on this bill tonight. >> you can ask about strike because t
. >>> two ads will not be seeing certain ads in britain because they are misleading. the airbrushed images exaggerated the results of using those make up products. >>> more signs of the economic slowdown. >>> a summer slowdown, a survey by the federal reserve fines that economic growth slowed this summer in eight of its 12 districts. the fed plans high unemployment, we come sales, and a slowdown in manufacturing. the government stopped collecting taxes on airline tickets but most airlines have not lowered ticket prices. the irs wants the airlines to issue refunds that the airlines say they sent the money to the government and the irs to pay. working moms should not feel guilty. their employment often improves chances their kids will be well adjusted especially with girls. the weak economy is taking a bite out of the tooth fairy. kids are now fighting an average of 40 cents less per tooth down from $3 to $2.60. >> that is tough when the tooth fairy is holding back. >> times are tough with the weather. >>> the heat and humidity will make a comeback tomorrow. today is not so great but tomorro
2 to 10 years old. >>> now to the phone hacking scandal that is rocking britain. it's already forced the tabloid "news of the world" to close. it's now threatening a $12 billion deal to take over a british satellite broadcast company. jeffrey kofman has the latest now from london. >> reporter: rupert murdock rushed to london to rescue the $33 billion media empire he has spent his life building. "the news of the world," the paper that began his overseas expansion 42 years ago. the best-selling tabloid was on the newsstands here for the last time. >> if you've done wrong you face the consequences. >> reporter: the paper brought down by criminal compelses of reporters in search of sensational stories. in the eyes of many it was brought down by management that still refuses to acknowledge its own role. that is rebecca brooks. she was editor while many of the crimes were committed. 270 people lost their jobs this weekend. she stays. but murdock may lose a huge business deal. his plan to take 100% control of britain's b sky b satellite network. this scandal has highlighted what many in bri
murdoch's media empire. one of the names is one of britain's most powerful figures. plus, kidnapped and held captive for 18 years, jaycee dugard is speaking out for the very first time about her nightmare ordeal from being tasered by her captors to being forced to live in a shed without a toothbrush. her amazing story coming up. >>> well, sunday won't be the same for millions of people in britain who flipped through "the news of the world" each and every weekend. this is what they saw on the front page yesterday, "thank you and good-bye." they couldn't survive the phone hacking and phone scandals so it closed up shop. no more "news of the world," the largest selling paper that circulated more than 170 years. scandal over, right? wrong. it's wider today. it involves more people, including a former prime minister. let's go to london to my colleague, becky anderson. all of the twists and turns, give me the latest. help me keep my media scandals straight, please? >> if you blinked today, you'd miss something. if rupert murdoch thought getting to the weekend and closing down the news of
. someone tried to throw a glass in my face. so many people, particularly mps, in britain, are taking credit for taking apart murdoch's empire. it was sean hoare. he was a good guy. stood up for good values in journalism and so disappointed that andy coulson, who regularly asked him to hack into people's phones, you know, the master of the dark arts turned round when we started getting caught. it wasn't us, so it wasn't me, it was the reporters, and the reporters now are getting, you know, arrested or brought into scotland yard. time and time again, rebekah brooks said we knew nothing about it it wasn't us. and andy coulson said it wasn't us, and that made sean hoare angry it made me angry. you generally shouldn't throw your sheep to the wolves. >> was he worried about something, did he have issues because of the scandal? >> he -- well, i mean, i felt quite stressed for the last two or three weeks particularly, i think my blood pressure is a bit raised. and if you've got an existing i believe heart condition, he looked a bit of a mess recently. and the stress of this wouldn't have helped. i
it worthless. just a day or two ago, britain's top diplomat said that it would be possible to work out some kind of a deal with libya in which gadhafi could be allowed to stay in libya if he agreed to step down from power. that seemed to be a step backwards from britain, which was repeated by france. today britain's top diplomat came out more forcefully announcing he would hand over the libyan regimes embassy in london to the rebel counsel in the east in the city of bengazie. announced more than $100 million worth of frozen libyan government assets would be given over to the rebels. we have seen a growing number of western governments including the u.s. government announce similar plans to recognize the rebel council as the only legitimate authority here and announcing plans to hand over hundreds of millions of dollars to the rebels, and that of course is a proposal that the embattled government here in tripoli rejects. >> we appreciate your reporting. >>> it's about 15 minutes before the top of the hour. here is a look at some of the top stories we're following. a federal judge threw out a
is the latest -- britain is the latest example. >> sipe cyber attacks will be -- shall cyber attacks will be the future part of combat. >> the pentagon won't say which country they think is responsible for the latest breach but in recent years there's been critical data stolen on aircraft electronics, surveillance technology and satellite communications. >>> speaking of computers, new research suggest the internet is replacing our own memory. new research in the journal science finds when we rely on having information stored somewhere les you may be less likely to remember it yourself. researchers say they are not worried relying on external memory systems like the web will cause our brains to atry if i but there may be things we know and forget but hang onto what's useful on a daily basis. >>> and back here in maryland today through sunday, we will be -- it will be operation helping heros. the ride started early this morning at sandy point mareba solomon's island yacht club and by riding 400 miles round trip in three days, the eastern pennsylvania river runners hope to raise 3,000 d
on britain's phone hacking scandal in less than a half hour top london police official will testify. >>> head of news corp. rupert murdoch is to appear wisdom. >>> british prime minister ordered a special particle meantry session. >> yesterday, scotland yard's number two was forced to design this less than 20 hours after the commissioner himself stepped down. both claim their integrity is intact but staying on would be a distraction amidst intense media coverage of the role police media mail have played here and for hiring a news of the world editor now under arrest at a pr consultant. rebecca brooks who resigned as head of rupert murdoch's newspaper on sunday after she voluntarily went in for questioning. >> the position of rebecca brooks can be simply stated she is not guilty of any criminal offence. the position of the metropolitan police is less easy to understand. >>> government remains politically tainted as well the prime minister david cameron on official business in africa again under pressure to explain why he hired former news of the world editor andy cole son as chief of communica
emergency session of the british parliament on the phone hacking scandal, rocking britain. british prime minister david cameron getting tough questions from lawmakers emphatically denying claims his staff tried to interfere in phone hacking and police bribery at the news of the world newspaper. >> cameron cut short a trip to south africa, rushing back to britain to deal with this scandal he is under fire hiring andy coleson he was editor during this whole hacking scandal. >> it has been suggested that my chief of staffer was behaving wrongly, when he didn't take up commissioner crates offer to be proofed on phone hacking i said that they should pursue the evidence wherever it leads, and arrest exactly who they wish. and that is exactly what they have done. >> now yesterday, during testimony by news corp. chairman rupert murdoch a protestor hurled a plate of shaving cream at him his wife wendy on the left in the pink see her right behind him now landed a right hook on the guy before the police arrested him before the encounter, murdoch and his son james told particle meantry committee the
. it is the gown that katherine wore when she married britain's prince william. the ivory and white is a in the dress is the centerpiece at buckingham palaces annual summer opening. the gone stands on a special platform topped off with a tiara the queen loaned katherine for that wedding. >>> wolf blitzer joins us in such a few minutes. first breaking news. we want to get you caught up right now. >>> survivor describing how he avoided the gunman that shot up a youth camp in norway. 85 people died following a bombing in the capital of oslo which claimed seven lives. police have suspect in custody. michael, what's happening now? >> reporter: yeah. i can tell you, we've just heard on local media here that the lawyer for the suspect in this case, his name is anders behring breivik, the lawyer is telling the local television here that the shooting suspect believed that his actions were atrocious, but necessary. that's within the last few minutes. his lawyer saying that he believed his actions were atrocious but necessary. and how atrocious were there? 85 people, most of them kids killed o
in the united states when they subpoena people, it's similar in great britain. parliament has issued the equivalent of subpoena to her, and to rupert murdoch and his son. they've all agreed they're going to testify. what's the implication of that? >> well, she's a british citizen, so she has to get there, go there, and she has to testify. she's said she would appear in front of that parliamentary committee. she's going to answer tough questions, what did she know, when did she know it and does she personally bear any responsibility for what happened. she was editor at the time when a teenager was new murdered ands of the world was deleting voicemail messages that for a brief time allowed her parents to believe she was alive. that's really what set this whole thing off. this woman was editor at the time. she's got tough questions to answer, but this whole scandal is by no means over, both in this country and in the united states. it has rocked the relationship between the police, the media, the politicians, and it's uncovering some pretty dirty, uncomfortable messy stuff that's hangin
in britain may bh saying it's just the tip of the iceberg. two more murdoch newspapers are now being implicated by a former british prime minister. what are the latest allegations, becky, out there today. >> it's quite remarkable. if rupert murdoch thought he was going to draw a line under this by jetting in this weekend and closing down "the news of the world" he got another thing coming today. three strands to this story. and if you blinked, wolf, let me tell you, you missed part of this story today. the most of the important, probably coming from the office of gordon brown, the former prime minister. allegations that other papers in the news international stable, and of course "the news of the world" was part of that stable, may have illegally blogged information on him and on his family. it was a tweet from his wife today saying so sad to learn all about my family's privacy is very personal. he's not saying he was hacked into as one paper reports. what he is saying is that journalists and/or private investigators from the sun newspaper and or the sunday times newspaper, and that'
of the world" when the most disgraceful allegations took place. to many in britain she became the face of this scandal, right? >> reporter: yeah, now she has finally gone after days of sort of clinging on to her job by her fingernails with everyone from the prime minister downward saying she should go. finally, this morning, she did resign. that's not the end of the story yet. she and rupert and james murdoch all have to appear before a committee in the building behind me on tuesday and they will be grilled by politicians who want some answers as to who knew what and when. >> dan rivers live out of london, we will follow the fallout, of course, from that resignation. >>> it took one of the fbi's most intense manhunts to finally nail mob boss whitey bulger but even behind bars, what damage can he still do? deborah feyerick looks into that. >> i met whitey between the age of 15 and 16. >> reporter: john shay, nicknamed red, grew up in a tight knit world of south boston's old housing colony projects. a golden glove boxer with a wild streak wanted to be just like whitey bulger and the gang
of britain's top cop, the man in charge of scotland yard. sir paul stephenson says he did nothing wrong but regrets the criticism that his police failed to do enough. >> however the issue of my integrity is different. let me state clearly, i, and the people who know me, know that my integrity is completely intact. i may wish we had done some things differently, but i will not lose any sleep over my personal integrity. >> let's get the latest now from london and cnn's dan rivers. >> reporter: kyra, another scalp has been claimed by this ever-growing scandal. the most senior policemen in britain, sir paul stephenson, has resigned. meanwhile, the former chief executive of news international, of rupert murdoch's paper, rebecca brooks, was taken in for questioning, detained some 12 hours sunday night and released just after midnight. there was speculation that would have meant that she wouldn't have turned up on tuesday afternoon, london time, to be grilled by politicians. but we're being told by her spokesman that she will be there. she won't appear together with james and rupert murdoch. s
on the widening media jajeds in great britain. police have uncovered enough information to expand the investigation to other companies and rupert murdoch is back in the united states after facing tough questions from members of the british parliament. analysts believe murdoch and his son james managed to cape the damage to their company news corp. but the damage is jaw-dropping as how sleazy some of tactics were. cnn a cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: like the "news of the world" it appears every one everywhere was fair game. actors. business tycoons. royals. prime ministers. politicians. all potential front page fodder caught up in a type of scandal driven journalism that bordered on blood sport. allegedly involving hacking, tracking and outright bribes. >> they very much crossed the line and they didn't just do it once or twice. we are not talking about a single rogue reporter. apparently, it happened at least 4,000 times. >> reporter: media executive bonnie fuller has been the driving force behind magazines like "star" "us weekly." you have a much stronger takedown culture
thank you and good-bye from britain's best-selling tabloid, the latest fallout from the phone hacking scandal on "morning joe." somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> 47 past the hour. after weeks of controversy, resignations and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue on sunday. it comes as its rooival, "the mirror," claims today that a new york police officer asked for voice mails of 9/11 victims. stephanie gosk reports on the "news of the world's" demise and its final day. >> with the ink barely dry on the final edition of news of the world, 80-year-old media baron rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to do damage control. on display, his unqualified support of melissa brooks. smiles for
last month. >>> time now 4:45. britain's phone hacking scandal could be spreading to the u.s. the celebrity who says he was targeted in america. >> the nfl has a deal but it's not a touchdown just yet. the final dispute holding up the football season. >> and a major milestone for bay area rescue group. what makes this sea lion survivor so special. and the online contest that he is inspiring. >>> and we are cleared for take- off here at sfo today. a little cooler today than we saw yesterday. going to make it to 72. mostly sunny skies. a little bit of lingering cloud cover. warmer as we make our way to houston today. they are going to make it to 97 degrees. have a chance of seeing showers and thunderstorms 20% chance nothing too significant and more 90s as we continue to make our way to atlanta today topping out at 94 mostly sunny skies there. we'll have a full look at your bay area forecast coming up. , ,,,,,, sure, pulling the mold, mildew, and grime from out of the porous caverns of grout takes the right tools, but it also takes a gentle, caring touch. before you can deep
doctrine of hate. one secretary said we have to figure out where to draw the line. in britain, we decided that we will not use religion to draw this line. we will say the terrorists on one side and everybody else on the other side. there is an effort t .. have to avoid that. host: catherine herridge of fox news. how do you find the balance between protecting civil liberties and second-generation americans, and doing the investigative work you are doing? one of the nuances you are talking about is looking at -- muslims, who were bo >> just in my work i follow wherever the facts lead becauset i cover a 10-year. i some of them are converts to islam. there is no question. i would argue that the islam they are practicing is not the islam of most muslim americans. iis is as i call it a digital g hyde or an ideology of hate. i can tell you that when you looked, what you see is someone who leads a very double life. one of the things i try to bring out in the book is that in manya respects this man is a fraud, whether it was defrauding man w $20,000 to go to school, pretending that he couldn't rem
, the level of economic interdependence between britain and germany was such that it was in some ways madness these two countries went to war. there was a very famous book written by a young historian who talked about the fact that perhaps britain should not have gone to war. that this was craziness for britain to do it and it was the pity of war. wait a minute. that historian was niall ferguson. >> yes, before we end the rebuttal portion of this debate, i'd like to allow dr. kissinger the last word. >> i don't know whether one can reverse the order of participants up here, because i think it's three to one against my friend niall. our chinese friend is saying that china has suffered a great deal, has been provoked through a century of western exploitations and that it's not trying to dominate the world. as i understand what he is saying it is this -- when the west wants to discuss climate or the financial assistance, our tendency is to say china can be a stakeholder. it can be a participant in a system they did not themselves participate in creating. so the issue is whether it is possible to
of blockbuster lineup but would not say who will perform. the concert will be held in britain and proceeds will go to charity. >>> we want to take a look at the day ahead. a big crowd is expected when montgomery county residents away in on a proposed curfew. the plan calls for people under 18 to be home by 11:00 p.m. sunday through thursday, and midnight friday and saturday. the plans of a vote is expected in the fall. a public hearing will be held at 1:30 at council headquarters in rockville today. >>> bob mcdonnell will sign a bill that is designed to prevent accidents. ashley's law was killed -- is named after a woman that was killed in 2008 when a police officer not with a siren drove through a red light. it will require emergency vehicles to use flashing lights are turned on their sirens going through intersections. >>> commonwealth could be the next state to pass caylee's law. it would require a parent to report to police if a child is missing within 24 hours. the state senator says he will introduce the bill in the next session. it is inspired by the casey anthony case. similar laws
scandal in britain, david cameron will be in the hot seat today. british lawmakers will question the prime minister about hiring the former editor of the news of the world tabloid to be its communications chief. lawmakers questioned rupert murdoch yesterday. >>> attorney general eric holder says that he would welcome a meeting with families of 9/11 victims who are concerned that their funds may have been hacked. the fbi is investigating whether news corp. targeted 9/11 victims and whether any laws make an unbroken. >>> all systems are go for the space shuttle atlantis' final landing. the astronauts tested the flight systems and everything checked out perfectly. atlantis is scheduled to land at the kennedy space center at 5:56 tomorrow morning. nasa says the forecast is looking great so far. that's different from when it took off. >> fortunately, they got caught off in time. our temperatures today 94 degrees already. 5:36 is the time. >> are your favorite restaurant tipping the scales when it comes to calories? who wins this year's winseating award. >> sizzling temperatures in our area stil
in britain. no word yet on who's performing. organizers say tickets will go on sale next month. germane and randy jackson oppose the show because it will be held during the trial of the doctor charged in their brother's death. >>> the broadway musical hair ended with kisses last night. three couples with ties to broadway took the stage and exchanged wedding vows. the cast of "hair" campaigned hard for same-sex marriage and celebrated the new york law that just went into effect. >>> grammy winner amy winehouse will be laid to rest today. fans created a memorial outside her london apartment after her death on saturday. >> more tests will be done to determine what killed the troubled singer. an addiction to drugs and alcohol derailed her aspiring music career. she was 27 years old. >> winehouse's death bears similarities to several other well-known artists over the last 40 years or so. >> with the british media following their every move, amy winehouse's grieving parents slowly made their way around the gates of winehouse's london hope stopping to read the many cards that have been left h
? >> britain is not in the euro and while i am prime minister, it will never be in the euro so we should not be involved in those internal arrangements. only eurozone countries were involved. only eurozone countries have been involved about further bailouts. it is right not to use the european financial stability mechanism for future support to greece. >> what discussions did he have about preparing for that the fault? in particular with the president who has said in the context of departure from the euro and the devolution of the monetary union, it does not have to be disorderly. >> what is causing disorder as instability in europe. it is the fact that cannot be changed. if greece can default. good money will be wasted failure of greece. why wasn't the prime minister your normal skeptical self and lead an orderly withdrawal? >> checks seem to be a it endangers species sincethey were in terminal decline. the council said there is no alternative. the council did not look too happy when they came before the treasury committee. >> it is a imperative as working to have a viable set of of tre
at a growing scandal in britain surrounding tabloid journalists accused of hacking into cell phones. stay with us. we'll be right back. 8:09now.        [ male announcer ] are you paying more and more for cable, and enjoying it less and less? stop paying for second best. upgrade to verizon fios and get tv, internet and phone for just $99.99 a month for a year. want to save even more? call now and we'll add over 60 premium channels, including showtime, starz, epix, and more for 12 months. fios is a 100% fiber optic network. it delivers superior picture quality, the best channel lineup, more hd, plus america's fastest, most consistent and reliable internet. and there's no annual contract required. why keep paying for cable? move up to the best. get fios tv, internet and phone for just $99.99 a month for a year, plus over 60 premium channels for 12 months. don't wait. call 1.877.729.fios. call the verizon center for customers with disabilities that's 1.877.729.3467. at 800-974-6006 tty/v. or for other great fios offers, visit us online. get the network that delive
. >>> the demise are one of the most widely red newspapers on the planet, britain's "news of the world" will shut down after sunday's issue. cnn's dan rivers joins us from london. dan, this was amazing the speed in which he made this decision, shut it down. >> it was a complete bolt from the blue, candy. the police think there may be up to 4,000 potential victims in this phone hacking scandal. they've had their messages eaves dropped upon by tabloid journalists. it is without do you the biggest scandal to have hit the british pressure. ruper murdock has closed down that paper, but this phone-hacking scandal is not over yet. it didn't take long for staff from "news in the world" to end up in the local pub. losing your job normally results in drinking a pint, and now they had a lot to reflect on. >> it was completely unexpected, and collective devastation. >> reporter: the 168-year-old tabloid is a british institution, but the phone hacking scandal had left it in a political vortex from which it couldn't escape. its owner, media mogul rupered murdock realized his entire empire was at risk. one can
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